Date of Award

7-2016

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

First Advisor

Mary Roth

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects on reaching achievement for middle school students using Test one and Test three of the Discovery Education™ assessments. Students took the pretest and participated in corrective instruction and interventions. After interventions, students took Test three. A quantitative research design was used to examine data collected from 116 students from three southeastern state public schools from the school years of 2014-2015 and 2015-2016.

This research study explored teachers’ perceptions of time using the 2014 North Carolina Working Conditions Survey time construct from the three public schools. An additional research question addressed the correlational relationships among the variables of students’ reading growth and teachers’ strongly agree and agree respondent percentages of action planning time as measured by the North Carolina Working Conditions Survey. This study found no significant relationships among the primary variables of student reading growth and teachers’ perceptions of action planning time. However, statistically significant relationships were found between students’ Test one to Test three scores who participated in interventions.

The findings in this study will be beneficial to elementary and secondary principals who are held accountable for literacy development, implementation, and evaluation as the school instructional leader. In addition, school leaders can use this in order to gain insight as to the skill sets and strategies to use to create positive working and learning conditions for their teachers and students. The findings in this study will also be beneficial to directors of curriculum instruction as well as district superintendents in how recommendations are made to school boards for changes in policies of implementation and monitoring effective reading interventions for students and building positive teacher morale and teacher efficacy.