Date of Award

7-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Nursing (MSN)

First Advisor

Tracy Arnold

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to determine what the relationship is between student performance on the Kaplan Nursing School Entrance Exam, academic success, and attrition. Nursing Undergraduate Retention and Success (NURS) Model by Marianne R. Jeffreys (2012) was the theoretical framework for a study. The population consisted of 94 BSN students at a southeast public university in North Carolina. An existing nursing student database was used to collect the data. The independent variables were Kaplan Nursing School Entrance Exam scores, including the composite score and subtest scores in math, science, reading, and writing. The dependent variable, academic success, was measured using earned grades in nursing courses during the first year in the upper division of the nursing program. The results of the correlational analyses showed that two of the independent variables were significantly correlated with academic success. Kaplan Score (rs = 0.32, p < .001) and Science skill (rs = 0.37, p < .001) were statistically significant with a weak positive correlation. The dependent variable, program completion, was used to measure using graduation status at the end of the five semesters. Two of the independent variables were significantly correlated with program completion. Kaplan Score (rs = 0.25, p < .017) and Science skill (rs = 0.23, p < .025) were statistically significant with a weak positive correlation. Math, reading, or writing skills were not statistically significant with academic success or program completion. Results of the correlational analysis showed a significant positive relationship between academic success and program completion (rs = .789, p < .001). The attrition rates of 18-37% for each term was no different than the national average (Baum, Ma, & Payea, 2013).

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