Date of Award

2017

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Nursing (MSN)

First Advisor

Quanza Mooring

Abstract

Caring for others is stressful work. Research has shown that nurses are leaving practice and have identified job-related stressors which lead to burnout as a primary cause. A review of literature revealed that burnout is common in nursing and that this syndrome decreases the quality of care, produces negative outcomes, and leads to a decline in displaying caring behaviors. Studies identified that people who possess high levels of emotional intelligence (EI) experience less burnout in their jobs. EI, a rising field of study that includes the recognition, understanding, expression, and management of emotions, may offer plausibility for effectively navigating occupational stress with the goal of diminishing burnout and maintaining caring behaviors. The question was raised as to whether or not a relationship exists between the level of emotional intelligence in nurses and their ability to demonstrate caring behaviors in the clinical setting. A quantitative, correlational study was conducted among a convenience sample of 100 nurses (n=100) in a mid-sized tertiary care center. Data was collected using Schutte’s Assessing Emotions Scale and Coates’s Caring Efficacy Scale. Sixty-six percent of the nurses surveyed placed in the top quartile on total scoring for emotional intelligence and caring efficacy. Results revealed a positive statistically significant positive correlation (r = 0.26, p < 0.007) between the level of emotional intelligence in nurses and their ability to demonstrate caring behaviors.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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