Date of Award

2014

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Nursing (MSN)

First Advisor

Cindy Miller

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the perception of health care professionals (staff nurses) regarding family presence during resuscitation. The sample consisted of 59 nurses of different ages and working in different departments. The Staff Perceptions of Family-Witnessed Resuscitation questionnaire was used to collect data. The relationships between participants' demographic data and perceived attitudes and beliefs were also analyzed. Many of the healthcare professionals felt that it was acceptable to have family members present during resuscitation if the patient makes clear decisions prior to the incident or if the physician makes the decision for the patient. Almost half of the healthcare professionals had invited family members to the bedside at some point during resuscitation. Factor analysis identified five factors: attitudes, values, fears, efficacy, and family behavior. The healthcare professionals did not respond as having negative attitudes or fears regarding inviting family members to the bedside during resuscitation. Males (N = 13) had higher scores compared to females (N = 46) for factors regarding healthcare professionals' attitudes and healthcare professionals' values. The results suggested that males believe that they have a more positive view towards the death/dying process. There were no differences on the factor scores based on years of experience. There were also no significant differences in the responses when comparing the different units where the nurses work or the age of the nurses. The overall results showed that the respondents have a neutral opinion on three of the five factors: attitudes, fears, and family behaviors. The data suggested that healthcare professionals have positive believes about their personal levels of caring and compassion.

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