Date of Award

12-2016

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

First Advisor

Kelly Clark

Abstract

The study detailed in this dissertation was designed to examine and understand student perceptions of self-efficacy, motivation, student-teacher relationships, and procedural differences during the transition to middle school. The mixed-methods study utilized a survey, focus groups, and interviews to triangulate the data.

An analysis of the data revealed that there is a statistically significant difference between student perceptions of motivation and self-efficacy at School A and School B. The researcher found that students at School A had a more positive perception in the areas of motivation and self-efficacy than School B, yet School B met its predicted growth score and School A did not. The paired t test established that there is no statistically significant difference between student perceptions of the difference between elementary and middle school and teacher/student relationships at School A and School B. The qualitative data provided by the focus groups and interviews allowed the researcher to establish that students from both schools have similar positive perceptions of consistency with teacher expectations from class to class, confidence, and being prepared for the transition to middle school.

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